CanLaw was the first, and still is the best, online find a lawyer referral service. Beware of copy cats

CanLaw

Find A Lawyer Near Me Referral Service

Current as of

HOW TO GET THE RIGHT TYPE OF LAWYER
Please Fill in This Form For Free Lawyer Referrals to the right type of lawyer for your case.


Lawyer's City - Canada Only

Select the closest type of case you have
Describe your case in an unemotional, professional manner.
Please do not name names. That could be defamatory.


characters left


How, Where and When Can Selected Lawyers Reach You

Do you require Legal Aid? Yes or No?
Best time to contact you:
Best way to contact you:
Ok to leave message:

First Name:
Last Name:
Phone:

Email:
City:



YES, Please Find a Lawyer For Me


Free Legal Advice, Half hour consultations Your information is encrypted for your protection
By submitting this form I certify that I have read and accept all of CanLaw's Terms of Service I authorize CanLaw to forward my referral request to lawyers or legal practitioners.

Law Office?

 

Click to Put Your

PROFILE  AD HERE

$250 year

 

Includes a free back

link to your web site

HARASSMENT LAW LAWYERS

Salem witch trials

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

 

The Salem witch trials were a series of hearings and prosecutions of people accused of witchcraft in colonial Massachusetts between February 1692 and May 1693. More than two hundred people were accused. Thirty were found guilty, nineteen of whom were executed by hanging (fourteen women and five men).

 

One other man, Giles Corey, was pressed to death for refusing to plead, and at least five people died in jail.[1]

Arrests were made in numerous towns beyond Salem and Salem Village (known today as Danvers), notably Andover and Topsfield. The grand juries and trials for this capital crime were conducted by a Court of Oyer and Terminer in 1692 and by a Superior Court of Judicature in 1693, both held in Salem Town, where the hangings also took place. It was the deadliest witch hunt in the history of colonial North America. Only fourteen other women and two men had been executed in Massachusetts and Connecticut during the 17th century.[2]

 

The first three accused witches were brought before the magistrates Jonathan Corwin and John Hathorne and questioned, even as their accusers appeared in the courtroom in a grand display of spasms, contortions, screaming and writhing. Though Good and Osborn denied their guilt, Tituba confessed. Likely seeking to save herself from certain conviction by acting as an informer, she claimed there were other witches acting alongside her in service of the devil against the Puritans. As hysteria spread through the community and beyond into the rest of Massachusetts, a number of others were accused, including Martha Corey and Rebecca Nurse–both regarded as upstanding members of church and community–and the four-year-old daughter of Sarah Good.

 

The episode is one of Colonial America's most notorious cases of mass hysteria. It has been used in political rhetoric and popular literature as a vivid cautionary tale about the dangers of isolationism, religious extremism, false accusations, and lapses in due process.

 

It was not unique, but a Colonial American example of the much broader phenomenon of witch trials in the early modern period, which took place also in Europe. Many historians consider the lasting effects of the trials to have been highly influential in subsequent United States history. According to historian George Lincoln Burr, "the Salem witchcraft was the rock on which the theocracy shattered."[4]

 

At the 300th anniversary events in 1992 to commemorate the victims of the trials, a park was dedicated in Salem and a memorial in Danvers. In November 2001, an act passed by the Massachusetts legislature exonerated five people,[5] while another one, passed in 1957, had previously exonerated six other victims.[6] As of 2004, there was still talk about exonerating all the victims,[7] though some think that happened in the 19th century as the Massachusetts colonial legislature was asked to reverse the attainders of "George Burroughs and others".[8] In January 2016, the University of Virginia announced its Gallows Hill Project team had determined the execution site in Salem, where the 19 "witches" had been hanged. The city dedicated the Proctor's Ledge Memorial to the victims there in 2017.[9][10]

 

 

 

 

CanLaw helps people just like you find a lawyer with the right solutions for real legal problems

Know Your Rights.                                   Do you think you have a case?                              How much is your case worth?

NEW Directory and Index for all of CanLaw
Click the FAQs Button to see how CanLaw's free lawyer referral service works to find the right type of lawyers for your case

Find the Right Type of Lawyer

 or Paralegal For Your Case

Ask A Lawyer Locate The Right Answers To Your Legal Questions   Get Legal Advice

CanLaw: Your Canadian Lawyer Referral Service

CanLaw ask a lawyer

CanLaw is the first and only FREE national lawyer referral service for individuals or businesses

requiring  lawyers or legal advice, legal aid or related services for any reason whatsoever, anywhere in Canada.